WILD TOMORROW FUND
TEAMS UP WITH DAVID YARROW
AND LX ARTS FOR HIS
FIRST NYC SOLO SHOW

We are honored to be a part of David Yarrow’s ‘It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere’ solo show at LX Arts in New York City. Having the support of people like David and LX Arts means, in simple terms, that more wild animals can be protected.

We work on the ground in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa to protect the region’s threatened wildlife and wild spaces. We simply cannot imagine incredible species like elephants, rhinos and lions, as well as all the much smaller species disappearing from our planet. We’re making sure this doesn’t happen. 

Our programs include saving land (habitat conservation), equipping and training rangers to help them keep animals safe from poachers, and supporting the people who live in the communities surrounding the wildlife reserves. 

SAVING LAND
Because the biggest threat to endangered species is habitat loss, land conservation is a key focus of Wild Tomorrow Fund. Our South Bank Project in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa aims to protect and rehabilitate 3,521 acres strategically located on the Mzinene River, which borders the 80,000 acre Munyawana Conservancy, home to Phinda Private Game Reserve. This globally recognized biodiversity hotspot is home to elephants, critically endangered black rhinoceros, white rhinoceros, and other endangered and threatened species. To date we have protected 2,406 acres of the South Bank.

SUPPORTING RANGERS
These brave men and women are the on the front lines of protecting wildlife. It only seems fair that they have uniforms and boots that are not falling apart and are adequately equipped. To date we have outfitted over 100 rangers with boots and uniforms, provided specialized training, and provided them with many pieces of equipment (no weapons have been donated).

HELPING COMMUNITIES
We believe that for conservation to be sustainable, the communities surrounding wildlife reserves must benefit, enabling local people to maintain their livelihoods, while protecting their natural heritage. Our community development initiatives include sponsoring two rural crèches (daycare centers) and an orphanage, and employing rangers from the local community to protect our Conservancy. We are particularly excited about our recently launched Green Mambas initiative, a group of single mothers who we are equipping and training to perform green jobs such as alien plant management. This provides the women with meaningful income and a true stake in our conservation mission. We believe the Green Mambas has great potential to grow, as there is significant recurring demand for environmental work in KwaZulu-Natal.